Your new career starts with training.

Follow these tips to prepare and feel confident as you begin your training.

Know your training requirements and deadlines.

Your employer can confirm your provider type, training requirements and deadlines.

If you are an Individual Provider (IP), your employer is CDWA.

Check your email and texts for training reminders.

If you do not have your own email account, you will need to make one and it’s a good idea to use the same email address for all caregiver-related accounts and activities.

Create your login for the Caregiver Learning Center.

To complete your training, you will need to log in to the Caregiver Learning Center. Follow the instructions sent to you when you first begin caregiving or learn how to get started online

Take advantage of your learning resources.

The Member Resource Center is available to help you with questions about training and language support. See all your options for learning support.

You have access to many free and low-cost benefits, once you are a caregiver.

This includes affordable healthcare coverage, an employer-funded retirement plan, free slip-resistant shoes and much more. Use your Welcome Guide to understand your benefits and make the most of them.

Available immediately:

  • Your learning benefits begin as soon as you decide to become a caregiver. This includes basic training to help you give high-quality care, plus many learning support resources to help you succeed.
  • You also get access to job-matching through Carina. Individual Providers (IPs) can use the care-matching service to find steady work or more hours.

 

When you begin working 80 hours or more a month for 2 months in a row:

  • You can enroll in high-quality healthcare coverage for as low as $25 a month. When you become eligible, you’ll get a letter in the mail inviting you to apply.
  • You can get a free pair of Caregiver Kicks, slip-resistant shoes.

 

After 6 months of working as a caregiver:

  • You’re automatically enrolled into your Secure Retirement Plan, which your employer contributes to. When you become a participant in month 7 or 8, you’ll receive a welcome letter.

 

After working as a caregiver for a while:

  • You will have the opportunity to build your skill set, grow professionally and increase your technical knowledge through Continuing Education.

Your learning benefits begin as soon as you decide to become a caregiver. This includes basic training to help you give high-quality care, plus many learning support resources to help you succeed.

Your learning benefits begin as soon as you decide to become a caregiver. This includes basic training to help you give high-quality care, plus many learning support resources to help you succeed.

Training Requirements

Learn about your unique training requirements by your provider type.

If you work for more than one employer and/or have multiple roles or multiple clients, you may have different training standards than indicated by the chart below. A provider may fall into more than one category—if so, they must meet the higher requirements for training and certification.

Provider Type
Orientation
and Safety
Basic Training
Continuing Education
Complete prior to providing care.
Complete by your training deadline.
12 hours required annually.
Standard Home Care Aide (HCA)

Caregivers who take care of clients, part- or full-time.

See the steps to become HCA
Basic Training 70
Adult Child Provider

Caregivers who take care of a parent or step-parent.

Also includes spouses or domestic partners who service a spouse/partner through the Veterans Affairs homecare program.
Basic Training 30
Limited Service Provider

Caregivers who work fewer than 20 hours a month.

Basic Training 30
Family Provider

Caregivers caring only for a child, sibling, aunt, uncle, niece, nephew, cousin, grandchild or grandparent, including relations by marriage or domestic partnership. Includes caregivers formerly called Parent Individual Providers (Non-DDA).

Basic Training 30
Parent Individual Provider (DDA)

Parents who take care of their child with a developmental disability.

Basic Training 9
Respite Provider

Caregivers who take care of another caregiver’s clients or family members for a short period of time (less than 300 hours per year).

Basic Training 7
If you have have a Nursing Assistant-Certified credential (NAC), the chart below applies.*
Providers with a NAC or Special Education Endorsement (OSPI)
Providers with an initial NAC or Special Education Endorsements (OSPI)
*Does not include LPNs, RNs, or ARNPs. If you are currently certified as an LPN or RN, CE is not required for your role as an Individual Provider or Agency Provider. You must maintain your LPN or RN credential and be in good standing with the state of Washington. Providers working in long-term care with a higher credential must maintain their credential or receive HCA certification before their credential expires to remain in compliance.

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Caregiver Learning Center System Maintenance

June 6 (Thursday) – June 10 (Monday)

You can log in, enroll and take your training in the Caregiver Learning Center during this time. 

If you complete training during the System Maintenance, it will be sent to your employer after June 10. 

Please contact your employer if you have questions about your training requirement, deadline or payment.